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What to do in Broadhaven & Pembrokeshire

Beaches | Castles and Heritage | Leisure Parks | Walks

Beaches

Broadhaven
Broad Haven is a favourite with bathers and watersports enthusiasts, with pubs, a shop, restaurant, cafe all in the immediate area. Broad Havens westerly facing sandy beach offers excellent conditions for kite-surfing, kite-buggying, windsurfing and surfing. There is a car park at the southern end of the beach opposite Haven Sports and a larger car park a small distance from the beach at the North End of the bay.


Little Haven
Little Haven is a picturesque old fishing village with steep streets that descend to a stony beach. The beach itself is popular with swimmers and divers in the summer months and thus can get very crowded. However, at low tide there is a pleasant walk along the beach to Broad Haven with numerous caves and rockpools to explore. Small campsites and guest houses are plentiful in this area and Little Haven itself has its own restaurants and pubs serving a selection of meals for the discerning diner. To find Little Haven follow the coast road south from Broad Haven.


Marloes Sands
Marloes Sands is a beautiful, isolated stretch of sand with rocky outcrops along its length. It is rarely busy and out of season if you make the effort to walk to the beach you are likely to have it to yourself. From the beach there are good views out to Skokholm and Gateholm Islands, the latter of which is at the North West end of the beach and can be reached on foot at low tide. The remains of neolithic to medieval settlements can be found on the island. To get to Marloes Sands, head to Marloes on the B4327 and just before the church in the village of Marloes turn left where you will find the car park and a signpost for the 1km walk to the beach.


Martins Haven
Martins Haven is a small stony beach which has the embarkation point for boat trips to Skomer and Skokholm Islands. Popular with divers, it can get very crowded although many people travel down to Martins Haven to walk the cliffs. Bird life abounds and in the late summer/autumn months, the seal pups can be seen from the cliffs above on the many secluded coves that abound this area of the coastline. A National Trust car park is available 200m from the 'beach' and toilets can be found on the road to the beach.


St Brides Haven
St. Brides Haven is a small cove with sand exposed at low tide and shingle/pebbles further up the beach. It faces North West so is protected from the South Westerly winds making it excellent for bathing. There are many rockpools to explore and the cove provides good views aross St. Brides Bay. To find it follow one of the small lanes that lead off the B4327. There is limited car parking available by the church. Toilets can be found above the beach.


West Dale
West Dale is a sand and shingle bay surrounded by steep unstable old red sandstone cliffs. The bay itself is West South West facing and therefore takes the brunt of the stormy seas. It has difficult access, strong rip tides, submerged outcrops, unpredictable currents and sometimes powerful waves although this does not deter the many surfers who use the beach. There are no amenities at the beach, but the nearby village of Dale offers shops, pub and accommodation. Limited parking is available along the roadside, from where it is a 10 minute walk along the coast path to the beach.


Dale
Dale offers a sheltered bay and is perfect for taking those first steps into the world of windsurfing. Dale has a shingle beach with some sand at low tide and an attractive seafront, all overlooked by Dale Castle on the hill above. There is a local pub and cafe/shop on the front making it an excellent place to while a few hours watching the yatching/boating fraternity at play on the water. Car parking is plentiful although it can get busy at peak season such as bank holidays.


Nolton Haven
Nolton Haven is a sheltered shingle cove which also offers a sandy beach area. Accomodation is available in Nolton Haven itself from a choice of caravans to self catering accommodation. There is also the Mariners Arms which provides accommodation and it also serves meals. Parking is available and Nolton Haven can be found on the coast road between Newgale and Broad Haven or by following the signs from the A487.


Druidstone Haven
A remote but good beach for exploring its big caves and rocks. The beach is mostly sand but if you explore southwards along the beach you will find lots of rocks and at low tide a few caves. There is no car park and space along the small road has to be found to park. There are no toilets or other facilities. There is a hotel next to the beach which serves lunches and evening meals.


Newgale
Newgale is probably one of the most dramatic views as you approach it either way from the road. It provides the ideal location for water sports. There is always plenty of space on the long, two mile stretch of flat sand and whilst the Atlantic Oce an rollers ensure some exciting surf, it is a safe beach for the young and not so expert. The beach is patrolled by lifeguards during the school holidays. It is easy to find, lying midway between Haverfordwest and St. Davids on the main A487 road. There is a cafe at both ends of the beach and the Duke of Edinburgh Inn is next to Newsurf on the sea front. There is ample free parking and also a small picnic area.


Solva
Solva is a busy little village in the summer, with plenty of cafes, restaurants, pubs and gift shops. There is not the best of beaches but it does have a very picturesque little harbour from where a pleasant afternoon watching the small boats coming and going can be spent.

 


Castles and Heritage

St Davids
Great Britain's smallest city located in the far west of Wales. Steeped in history, the city is a vibrant centre of activity located in the heart of the beautiful Pembrokeshire Coastal National Park.

St Davids Cathedral
Situated below the tiny city of St Davids this cathedral is worth a visit to view both its beauty and historical past. Purported to be one of the most ancient cathedrals in the UK. www.stdavidscathedral.org.uk


Pembroke Castle
Situated within minutes of beaches and the breathtaking scenery of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park. This mighty fortress is birthplace of Henry VII, father to the infamous Henry VIII and grandfather to Elizabeth I. Explore from the top of the lofty towers to the cavern deep beneath. A fascinating castle visit with stunning exhibitions, relating to the castle's history, that will captivate all ages. Enjoy a picnic in the beautifully kept grounds, or on the roof of St. Annes's Bastion and take in the views along the estuary. A visit to Pembroke Castle is not complete without a stroll around its tranquil waterway setting, and then on into the medieval walled town of Pembroke with its old buildings many of them housing, restaurants and speciality shops. Events are held every weekend throughout the summer months - for more information see www.pembrokecastle.co.uk


Carew Castle and Mill
Carew Castle is justly celebrated as one of the most magnificent castles of South Wales. Its position is low-lying, but still prominent in the flat land around the tidal reaches of the Carew river. The castle stands at the end of a ridge at a strategically excellent site commanding a crossing point of the still navigable river.


Llawhaden Castle
Located about 8 miles east of Haverfordwest, just off the A40. The narrow approach road into Llawhaden gives no hint that the great bishops once took refuge here. Even the village itself, quiet and rather secluded, hides the splendor of its medieval past.


Picton Castle
Was once the home to the Philipps family and a substantial number of friends and servants. Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries the Philippses of Picton Castle were the most powerful family in Pembrokeshire, exercising tremendous political, social and economic influence over all aspects of local life. A centre of squirearchal government, and a focus of local social and cultural life, functions which it has retained in some measure to the present day. Picton Castle is now owned by the Picton Castle Trust.


Cilgerran Castle
Stands on a precipitous, craggy promontory overlooking the river Teifi where it merges with the Plysgog stream. The Teifi here is just at its tidal limit, so the castle was able to control both a natural crossing point and the passage of seagoing ships.


Manorbier Castle
About 6 miles from Tenby lies Manorbier Castle, the birthplace of the 12th Century scholar Gerald of Wales who described Manorbier as ‘the most delectable spot in Wales’. The remains of this picturesque seaside castle date to a period later than Gerald of Wales himself, and it was extensively restored in the 19th Century, but the view is timeless and excellent looking out to the tiny secluded cove of Manobier beach. Life-size figures enhance a family's exploration of the castle and grounds.


Leisure Parks

Oakwood Leisure Park
One of the UK's top ten theme parks and one of Wales' largest tourist attractions with over 400,000 visitors each year. Boasting over 40 rides and attractions, there's something for everyone, which includes the world-class white knuckle ride, Hydro, Europe's fastest and wettest water coaste;, Megafobia, the acclaimed wooden rollercoaster; Vertigo, a 50m sky coaster and The Bounce, the UK's only shot and drop tower coaster. With rides for all the family you can be sure of a great day out - whatever the weather. www.oakwoodthemepark.co.uk//


Folly Farm
Situated in the heart of Pembrokeshire, Folly Farm is one of the largest family attractions in Pembrokeshire and offers a host of fun activities from hundreds of friendly animals, an amazing vintage funfair, exotic children's zoo, shows, entertainment, refreshments and more. www.folly-farm.co.uk


Heatherton Leisure Park
An amazing day out for all the family. Located near Tenby, Pembrokeshire it features many activities, attractions and Sports. www.heatherton.co.uk


Walks

Walking in Pembrokeshire
Pembrokeshire's 186 mile long Coastal Path is renowned for its stunning views and is a delight to walk in either Winter or Summer; featuring easy, and some disability friendly, sections as well as more challenging stretches there is something here for everyone. Away from the Coastal Path Pembrokeshire boasts a large variety of other walks, from quiet counrtyside rambles to hiking on the Preseli Hills.

For comprehensive guides to walking in Pembrokeshire you could visit www.bestwalks.com/dyfedbooks.htm